THE LAVENDER ROUTE IN PROVENCE
Photos by Preben S. Kristensen
14/07/2006
www.thetravelphoto.com - tel:+447785225161
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Near Gordes, lavender is cultivated around the Abbaye de Sénanque, built by the Cistercian Order in the 12th century. Sitting in a valley, it seems untouched by the centuries.
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Near Gordes, lavender is cultivated around the Abbaye de Sénanque, built by the Cistercian Order in the 12th century. Sitting in a valley, it seems untouched by the centuries.
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Lavandula Angustifolia Miller (also known as "English Lavender", "True Lavender" or "Lavande Fine") grows wild in the arid Limestone hills of Provence and used to be collected in the wild for use as a herbal medicine and in the perfume industry. Nowadays, it is cultivated at an altitude of between 500 and 1500 metres. Cultivated here, on the hillslopes near Lagarde d'Apt, it is used to make the finest herbal products, such as essential oils. To obtain 1 kg of lavender essence, you need 130 kgs of flowers. One hectare produces an average of 15 kgs of true lavender.
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Lavender Fields near Sault.
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Lavender Fields near Sault.
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Lavender Fields near Sault.
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Lavender Fields near Sault.
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Lavender Fields near Sault.
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Lavender comes in many different colours.
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Most of the Lavender grown on the Plateau of Valensole is actually "Lavandin", a hybrid between true lavender (Lavandula Angustifolia Miller) and Aspic or Spike Lavender (Lavanda Latifolia Vill.), whose produce is used mainly in the soap and chemical industries. Lavandin produces a far higher yield of essential oil than the true lavender, but has different properties as it contains camphor. 80% of lavender grown in Provence is Lavandin.
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Most of the Lavender grown on the Plateau of Valensole is actually "Lavandin", a hybrid between true lavender (Lavandula Angustifolia Miller) and Aspic or Spike Lavender (Lavanda Latifolia Vill.), whose produce is used mainly in the soap and chemical industries. Lavandin produces a far higher yield of essential oil than the true lavender, but has different properties as it contains camphor. 80% of lavender grown in Provence is Lavandin.
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Lavender comes in many different colours.
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In Haute Provence, near Sault, lavender is cultivated to make bouquets and has the deepest blue colour of all.
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In Haute Provence, near Sault, lavender is cultivated to make bouquets and has the deepest blue colour of all.
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In Haute Provence, near Sault, lavender is cultivated to make bouquets and has the deepest blue colour of all.
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In Haute Provence, near Sault, lavender is cultivated to make bouquets and has the deepest blue colour of all.
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Simiane-la-Rotonde is perched on a hillside, surrounded by Lavender.
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Patterns of colour are created by the contrast between the Lavender and the colour of the soil.
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Glimpse of a Lavender field, framed by Almond Trees.
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At Le Château du Bois, near Lagarde d'Apt, the finest quality true lavender is cultivated to make essential oils and other herbal and beauty products.
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There are many different varieties of lavender, including white.
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A Ladybird enjoys the lavender.
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True Lavender doesn't have branches.
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True Lavender doesn't have branches.
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A little girl between the rows of Lavandin (a cultivated hybrid of lavender and aspic) growing on the Valensole Plateau.